The Lake District National Park - Pictures
North West England, UNESCO World Heritage Site

England's largest and most visited National Park is entirely within the county of Cumbria, it is a mountainous region with lakes and forests. England's highest peak, Scafell Pike is here as are the deepest and longest lakes and nearly 2,000 miles (3,150km) of rights of way. It is a popular holiday destination offering many outdoor activities, although most visitors stay within the towns and lakeside areas, it is associated strongly with Beatrix Potter who lived here and William Wordsworth among other poets.

All pictures as a slideshow


Not just lakes, but plenty of hills and mountains too.

Not just lakes, but plenty of hills and mountains too.

Not just lakes, but plenty of hills and mountains too.

Not just lakes, but plenty of hills and mountains too.

Not just lakes, but plenty of hills and mountains too.

Originally the hills were fully forested, raoming sheep keep them that way apart from the odd tree that grows through a crack in rocks where sheep can't get to.

Lake District hills.

Lake District hills.

Lake District hills.

Scattered amongst the hills are farms, estates and places to stay.

This is one of the wettest parts of the UK which allows these ferns to thrive on the shadow side of a traditional dry stone wall.

You need to walk to the more remote parts of the Lake District though other scenes such as this are right next to the road and parking areas.

You need to walk to the more remote parts of the Lake District though other scenes such as this are right next to the road and parking areas.

The larger lakes in valley bottoms often have easy to negotiate footpaths around them.

The larger lakes in valley bottoms often have easy to negotiate footpaths around them.

The larger lakes in valley bottoms often have easy to negotiate footpaths around them.

Sun and cloud often chase each other across the landscape making for ever changing scenes and vivid colours, lots of green though, this is England after all.

The dry stone walls such as those in this picture made from locally gathered stone (probably from these fields) are built without cement and may be hunderds of years old.

A mountain rowan tree in the foreground covered in red berries.

Gullies deliver streams to top up the lakes.

Every hill will have a name and probably a footpath to the top.

Mountain rowan tree.

The land is largely exposed, rocky and not productive enough for arable crops, sheep farming is the main use.

Farms can be picturesque and isolated. Many can be had as holiday lets, remote or more conveniently sitauted in towns and villages.

Take care when driving on remote roads as the sheep may wander on and off at will.

Lake District tree.

A damp patch of moss on a log provides a foothold for a fern.


All pictures as a slideshow